The History Of The Bisexual Flag & What It Represents

Image result for bisexual flag
The Bisexual Flag

The Bisexual flag, designed in 1988 by Michael Page, aimed to give bisexual individuals & community more visibility, both in society and in the LGBTQ+ community- this is due to the biphobia (the irrational fear of bisexuals) bisexuals face both in society and unfortunately, in their own community. But biphobia is another post for another day.

When creating the bisexual flag we know today, Page took the colors from an already existing symbol and stated, “In designing the Bi Pride Flag, I selected the colors and overlap pattern of the ‘bi angles’ symbol.” This simply means that Page was putting his own spin on the bisexual symbol- however, the biangles (or “bisexuality triangles”) origins are unclear.

 

Biangles (or “Bisexual Triangles”)

Another symbol for bisexuality, the crescent moon, avoids the Nazi movement’s pink triangle used to dehumanize homosexuals during World War 2. Again, that’s another post for another day. 

In terms of meaning, Page describes the meaning of the color scheme behind the flag- a dark pink, lavender, and a dark blue (and for a bit of extra knowledge, the ratio for the flag is 2:1:2) as follows, “The pink color represents sexual attraction to the same sex only (gay and lesbian). The blue represents sexual attraction to the opposite sex only (straight) and the resultant overlap color purple represents sexual attraction to both sexes (bi).” – however, this isn’t how I would define my bisexuality, as I like to define it as “sexual attraction to my gender & other genders” (aren’t labels cool like that?!) 

Image result for bisexual crescent moon
Bisexual Crescent Moon

In addition, Page delves deeper into the flags meaning, adding, “The key to understanding the symbolism of the Bisexual pride flag is to know that the purple pixels of color blend unnoticeably into both the pink and blue, just as in the ‘real world,’ where bi people blend unnoticeably into both the gay/lesbian and straight communities.”[3]

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